Sean Mick - Contemporary artist

Crypto Art

With the advent of Bitcoin and other crypto currency platforms it was only a matter of time before the emergency of cryptoart as a viable blockchain commodity would arise. The advantages are appealing, When a work of art is registered on a blockchain, its details — such as provenance and physical characteristics — are recorded and stored on a digital ledger, marked accordingly by time. All sales from there are recorded and are transparent. For artists this decentralized, all inclusive, gate keeper shunning platform allows for a freeform creativity and collaboration not seen in art in any large ecosystem. Here personal creativity rules and, as someone who does all concepts and layouts in purely digital form, it is a purely digital created and sold asset. My appeal to the platform and delivery is it’s reduction of carbon footprint, lack of studio necessity (in an ever increasingly unaffordable lottery of studio space in any major city and beyond). Crypto-art’s instant production access via a myriad of graphic applications and algorithms is one of great attraction to those hobbled by studio locations, financial resources, and commitments. That said, it’s no replacement for traditional art mediums by a long shot. These digital assets by and large are not physical works that can be displayed and interacted with, per se. Digital art does not have the immutability of purposeful scale, three dimensionality and participatory engagement with observer and setting — something that is not present in a gif or jpg. What it does offer is a leveled field to get a point of view out to a vast audience, to be part of a new digital ecosphere, all without needing to second guess if you’re good enough. All are welcome. Just be ready for critique. That, thankfully, will never be absent in any art form and only serves to make these new artists better and even more potent.

This work is based on my geometric forms but used as elements to tell or depict a narrative subject. The energy of the aobjects create the objects themselves. Much like nature only produced through code and consisting of 1’s and 0’s instead of a physical piece… for now. See my work on Mintbase.

Behold by Sean Mick 2020